Kennesaw Mountain June 1864

By Richard A. Baumgartner
and Larry M. Strayer

    In less than a month, General William T. Sherman's blueclad columns had marched and fought to within 30 miles of the spires of Atlanta, Ga. But at rugged Kennesaw Mountain northwest of the city in June 1864, their progress was stymied by the weather, terrain and tenacious resistance of the veteran Army of Tennessee led by General Joseph E. Johnston.
    "The days in front of Kennesaw," wrote a Confederate officer, "were the longest in the year. The firing began as soon as it was light enough for the gunners to see and all day long our line was searched by shot and shell. It will be readily understood how wearing this was to nerves and what a relief the coming of darkness brought." On the opposite side a Union soldier thought, "Only men of skin, bone and gristle could endure such service."
    Authors Richard Baumgartner and Larry Strayer vividly describe the tactical maneuvering and brutal battles between Sherman's Federals and Johnston's Confederates by utilizing hundreds of participant's diaries, letters, journals, memoirs and reports, as well as 175 wartime photographs - combining eyewitness narratives and images in an engrossing format which has become a Blue Acorn Press hallmark.
    This is the first book in 134 years to examine the killing fields surrounding Kennesaw, focusing on trench warfare and vicious fighting at Lost and Pine mountains, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, Mud Creek and Kolb's Farm, and culminating in Sherman's bloody repulse along Kennesaw's slopes on June 27.

Softcover, 8-1/2 x 11 format, 175 wartime photos, 11 engravings, maps, notes, bibliography, index. ISBN 1-885033-25-7.

Price:  $22.95 ^Top